GlossaryT.QuadraticFunction History

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November 27, 2008, at 03:48 AM by LFS -
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Definition: A polynomial? of first degree in one variable is called a quadratic function or quadratic equation.

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Definition: A polynomial? of second degree in one variable is called a quadratic function or quadratic equation.

March 17, 2008, at 02:40 AM by LFS -
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   BTW: Don't be fooled. Changing c does not change the size of the quadratic - it only moves it up and down!

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   BTW: Don't be fooled. Changing c does not change the size of the quadratic. It only moves it up and down!

March 17, 2008, at 02:38 AM by LFS -
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BTW: Don't be fooled. Changing c does not change the size of the quadratic - it only moves it up and down!

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Click and drag the slider buttons to change the function.

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March 17, 2008, at 02:33 AM by LFS -
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Example:    f(x)=3x^2+2x-1    is a quadratic function    а=3 \quad b=2 \quad c=-1     (other examples?)

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Example:    f(x)=3x^2+2x-1    is a quadratic function    а=3 \quad b=2 \quad c=-1     (other examples?)

March 14, 2008, at 04:46 AM by LFS -
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March 13, 2008, at 03:52 PM by LFS -
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Definition: A %red b polynomial? of first degree in one variable is called a quadratic function or quadratic equation.

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Definition: A polynomial? of first degree in one variable is called a quadratic function or quadratic equation.

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March 13, 2008, at 02:15 PM by LFS -
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  • The intersection of the parabola with y -axis is unique and is the point (0,с).
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  • The intersection of the parabola with y -axis is unique and is the point (0,с) (see y-intercept).
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March 13, 2008, at 02:12 PM by LFS -
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Page last modified on November 27, 2008, at 03:48 AM